Oregon Athapaskan Languages

Bibliography of the Athapaskan Languages of Oregon
© 2010 Don Macnaughtan

Ethnographic Bibliographies no. 6

blue pinMore on the other Indian Languages of Western Oregon


blue pin Full-size map version


The Athapaskan Languages of Oregon

The Athapaskans in Oregon originally migrated into this area over two millennia ago from northern Canada and Siberia. They are a distinct group who probably arrived from Asia in a separate, later migration from most Native Americans. They are linguistic relatives to groups in Northern Canada and Siberia, as well as the Navajo and Apache in the Southwest. Recent research has connected them to the Yeniseian (Ket) peoples of Central Siberia. Their name for themselves – “Tunne” – is cognate with the Navajo “Dine.” At some point, they split off from the southward migration of the Athapaskans, and settled into these remote pockets of land. They were found in small valleys from the Lower Columbia through the Umpqua and Rogue valleys in Southern Oregon. Their languages remained distinctive, but otherwise they shared many cultural similarities with their neighbors. How and when they found their way here is something of a mystery. Their descendants still live in Oregon today.

Oregon Athapaskan is divided into 5 main languages and about 14 dialects.

blue pin the Lower Columbia Language consisting of:

      • the Kwalhioqua dialect spoken in the Willapa Hills and the Boistfort Valley (north shore of the Lower Columbia River)
      • the Clatskanie dialect on the Upper Nehalem and Clatskanie Rivers (south shore of the Lower Columbia River)

blue pin the Umpqua Language consisting of:

      • the Upper Umpqua dialect spoken in the Umpqua Valley & along the North Umpqua River (southwestern Oregon interior)

blue pin the Coquille-Tututni Language consisting of:

      • the Coquille dialect spoken in the Upper Coquille Valley (southwestern Oregon interior)
      • the Kwatami dialect spoken along the Sixes River & at Floras Lake (southern Oregon coast)
      • several Tututni dialects spoken along the Lower Rogue & Pistol Rivers (southern Oregon coast)
      • the Chastacosta dialect spoken along the Rogue River Gorge (southwestern Oregon interior)

blue pin the Galice-Applegate Language consisting of:

      • the Taltushtuntede dialect spoken along Galice Creek (southwestern Oregon interior)
      • the Dakubetede dialect spoken in the Applegate Valley (southwestern Oregon interior)
      • the Gusladada dialect (?) spoken in the Upper Illinois Valley (southwestern Oregon interior)

blue pin the Chetco-Tolowa Language consisting of:

      • the Chetco dialect spoken along the Chetco & Winchuck Rivers (southern Oregon coast)
      • several Tolowa dialects spoken along the Smith River & around Lake Earl (extreme northwestern California)
      • sworegon

Discography

This short discography lists and annotates all the known recordings in the languages of the Chetco, Shasta Costa, Tututni, Upper Umpqua, Upper Coquille, and Galice-Applegate peoples of Southwest Oregon. Most of these recordings are unique wax cylinders, acetate discs, or aluminum discs held in archives in Washington DC and Seattle. In many cases, tape recordings are available for tribal members and researchers.

blue pin Frachtenberg, Leo J. Tututni Indian Music. 1915. 14 wax cylinders. 2 10-inch tapes. 50min.

  • These recordings are held in the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress (cylinders no. 884-897, tape nos. AFS 18,471 and 22,169). The recordings were made at the end of 1915 from Billie Sampson, Bensell Orton, Hoxie Simmons, and Archie Johnson at Siletz. There are songs in the Galice Creek, Chasta Costa, and Tututni Athapaskan languages. In addition, cylinder no. 888 is in the Umpqua Athapaskan language from Jack West, August 1915. Thirteen of the songs by Hoxie Simmons have been dubbed to tape no. AFS 22,169, and 27 of the remaining songs are archived on tape no. AFS 18,471 (see the Archive of Folk Culture web site.) All the recordings are indexed in The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies, Volume 3. Ed. Judith A. Gray. Washington: American Folklife Center, 1988. 279-286.

blue pin Golla, Victor K., and Ida Bensell. Vocabulary in Tututni from Ida Bensell, Siletz, Oregon. 1962. 27 min.

  • Audiotape recording (no. LA 143) in the Berkeley Language Center, University of California at Berkeley. The wordlist recording is of fair quality, and has extensive documentation.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville, and Coquille Thompson. Upper Coquille Athabaskan Music and Texts. 1934. 21 acetate discs.

  • Recordings no. 14705-14725 in the Melville Jacobs Collection, University of Washington, Seattle.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville, and Hoxie Simmons. Galice Creek Athabaskan Music and Texts. 1935. 16 acetate discs.

  • Recordings no. 14726-14729, 14740-14751 in the Melville Jacobs Collection, University of Washington, Seattle.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. Melville Jacobs Collection: Items 19-28, 43-46. 1975.

  • Seven audio cassettes of Coos and Athapaskan material from the Melville Jacobs Collection held at Southwest Oregon Community College Library, Coos Bay.

blue pin Marr, John P., and Coquille Thompson. Upper Coquille Athabaskan Sound Recordings from Coquille Thompson. 1941. 34 aluminum discs.

  • Recordings no. 970-1003 in the John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Washington DC. Tape recordings of this set were presented to the Coquille Indian Tribe by the President of the University of Oregon in May 1998.

blue pin Marr, John P., and Hoxie Simmons. Galice Creek Athabaskan sound recordings from Hoxie Simmons. 1941. 20 aluminum discs.

  • Recordings no. 1097-1116 in the John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Washington DC.

blue pin Marr, John P., and Lucy Smith. Tolowa-Tututni Sound Recordings from Lucy Smith. 1941. 14 aluminum discs.

  • Recordings no. 1244-1257 in the John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Washington DC.

blue pin Metcalf, Leon V., and Hoxie Simmons. Tape Recording of Galice Creek Athabaskan Music from Hoxie Simmons at Siletz, Oregon. 1955.

  • Audiotape recording in the Anthropology Archives, Washington State Museum, Seattle.

blue pin Pierce, Joe E., and Hoxie Simmons. Galice Creek Athabaskan Words and Phrases from Hoxie Simmons at Siletz, Oregon. 1962.

  • Audiotape recordings reputedly held at Portland State University, Portland. The tape has apparently gone missing in the last few years.

blue pin Pierce, Joe E., and Ida Bensell. Tape recordings of Tututni Athabaskan from Ida Bensell at Siletz, Oregon. 1962.

  • Audiotape recordings held at Portland State University, Portland. Fate unknown

Bibliography

blue pin Barry, J. Nielson. “The Indians of Oregon: Geographic Distribution of Linguistic Families.” Oregon Historical Quarterly 28 (1927): 49-61. Print.

blue pin Bennett, Ruth, edIndian Language Materials: Tolowa. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1972. Print.

blue pin Bennett, Ruth, edIntegration of Bilingual Emphasis Program Into the University Curriculum: Hupa, Yurok, Karuk and Tolowa Emphasis. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1987. 37p. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz, and Pliny E. Goddard. “Vocabulary of an Athapaskan Dialect of the State of Washington.” International Journal of American Linguistics 3 (1924): 39-45. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, LorenNow You’re Speaking Tolowa. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1995. 177p. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, Loren. “The Prolegomena to the Tolowa Athabaskan Grammar.” Diss. U of Oregon, 1997. 65p. Print.

blue pin Bennett, Ruth, ed. Indian Language Materials: Tolowa. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1972. Print.

blue pin Bennett, Ruth, edIntegration of Bilingual Emphasis Program Into the University Curriculum: Hupa, Yurok, Karuk and Tolowa Emphasis. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1987. 37p. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz, and Pliny E. Goddard. “Vocabulary of an Athapaskan Dialect of the State of Washington.” International Journal of American Linguistics 3 (1924): 39-45. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, LorenNow You’re Speaking Tolowa. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1995. 177p. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, Loren. “The Prolegomena to the Tolowa Athabaskan Grammar.” Diss. U of Oregon, 1997. 65p. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, Loren, ed. The Tolowa Language. Arcata: Humboldt State U, 1984. 354p. Print.

blue pin Bommelyn, Loren, and Berneice HumphreyXus We-Yo: Tolowa (Tututni) Language Dictionary. 2nd ed. Crescent City: Tolowa Language Committee, 1989. 488p. Print.

blue pin Bright, Jane O. “The Phonology of Smith River Athapaskan (Tolowa).” International Journal of American Linguistics 30 (1964): 101-107. Print.

blue pin Bright, Jane O., and William Bright. “Semantic Structures in Northwestern California.” American Anthropologist 67 (1965): 249-258. Print.

blue pin Collins, James. “Nasalization, Lengthening, and Phonological Rhyme in Tolowa.” International Journal of American Linguistics 55 (1989): 326-340. Print.

blue pin Collins, James. “Pronouns, Markedness, and Stem Change in Tolowa.” International Journal of American Linguistics 51 (1985): 368-372. Print.

blue pin Gatschet, Albert S. “Volk und Sprache der Maklaks im Sudwestlichen Oregon.” Globus Illustrirte Zeitschrift 35 (1879): 161-171, 187-189. Print.

blue pin Gifford, Edward W. “Tolowa.” Californian Kinship Terminologies. Berkeley: University of California, 1922. 15-17. Print.

blue pin Givon, T., and Loren Bommelyn. “The Evolution of De-Transitive Voice in Tolowa Athabaskan.” Studies in Language 24.1 (2000): 41-76. Print.

blue pin Golla, Victor K. “Tututni (Oregon Athapascan).” International Journal of American Linguistics 42 (1976): 217-227. Print.

blue pin Grigsby, Tom. “Some Observations About the Languages at Siletz.” The First Oregonians: An Illustrated Collection of Essays on Traditional Lifeways, Federal-Indian Relations, and the State’s Native Peoples Today. Ed. Carolyn M. Buan and Richard Lewis. Portland: Oregon Council for the Humanities, 1991. 107. Print.

blue pin Hall, Roberta L. “Language and Cultural Affiliations of Natives Residing Near the Mouth of the Coquille River Before 1851.” Journal of Anthropological Research 48 (1992): 165-184. Print.

blue pin Hoijer, Harry. “Athapaskan Languages of the Pacific Coast.” Culture in History: Essays in Honor of Paul Radin. Ed. Stanley Diamond. New York: Columbia UP, 1960. 960-976. Print.

blue pin Hoijer, Harry. “The Chronology of the Athapaskan Languages.” International Journal of American Linguistics 22 (1956): 219-232. Print.

blue pin Hoijer, Harry. “Galice Athapaskan: A Grammatical Sketch.” International Journal of American Linguistics 32 (1966): 320-327. Print.

blue pin Hoijer, Harry. “Galice Noun and Verb Stems.” Linguistics 104 (1973): 49-73. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “A Note on Athapaskan Glottochronology.” International Journal of American Linguistics 23 (1957): 291-297. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Virginia D. “Athapaskan Numeral Systems.” Diss. Indiana U, 1954. 55p. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Virginia D. “Athapaskan Numeral Systems.” International Journal of American Linguistics 21 (1955): 26-45. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. “Historic Perspectives in Indian Languages of Oregon and Washington.” Pacific Northwest Quarterly 28 (1937): 55-74. Print.

blue pin Krauss, Michael E. “Na-Dene and Eskimo-Aleut.” The Languages of Native America: Historical and Comparative Assessment. Ed. Lyle Campbell and Marianne Mithun. Austin: U of Texas Press, 1979. 803-901. Print.

blue pin Kroeber, Alfred L. “Goddard’s Californian Athabascan Texts.” International Journal of American Linguistics 33 (1967): 269-275. Print.

blue pin Landar, Herbert J. “Three Rogue River Athapaskan Vocabularies.” International Journal of American Linguistics 43 (1977): 289-301. Print.

blue pin Morice, Adrien G. “Chasta Costa and the Dene Languages of the North.” American Anthropologist 17 (1915): 559-572. Print.

blue pin The Pacific Northwest Tribes Indian Language Collection. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1976. 21 microfilm reels.

blue pin Parsons, Tom. “Joh Xush Nushling: ‘Again a Person I’ve Become’ in the Athabascan Tolowa Language.” The Pacific Century: Opportunities and Challenges for Continuing Education, NUCEA Region 6 Conference Proceedings. Los Angeles: National University Continuing Education Association, 1986. Print.

blue pin Pierce, Joe E., and James M. Ryherd. “The Status of Athapaskan Research in Oregon.” International Journal of American Linguistics 30 (1964): 137-143. Print.

blue pin Powell, J. W. “Indian Linguistic Families North of Mexico: Athapascan Family, Pacific Group.” Seventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1885-1886. Washington: GPO, 1891. 53. Print.

blue pin Sapir, EdwardNotes on Chasta Costa Phonology and Morphology. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania Museum, 1914. 69p. Print.

blue pin Schaeffer, Claude. “Indian Tribes and Languages of the Old Oregon Country: A New Map.” Oregon Historical Quarterly 60 (1959): 129-133. Print.

blue pin Seaburg, William R. “A Wailaki (Athapaskan) Text with Comparative Notes.” International Journal of American Linguistics 43 (1977): 327-332. Print.

blue pin Suttles, Wayne P., and Cameron SuttlesNative Languages of the Northwest Coast. Map. Portland: Western Imprints, 1985. Print.

blue pin Tuttle, Siri G. “Stress and Vocal Length in Tolowa.” Diss. U of Washington, 1990. 40p. Print.

blue pin Whistler, Kenneth W. “Linguistic Prehistory in the Northwest California Culture Area.” A Study of Cultural Resources in Redwood National Park. Ed. Polly M. Bickel. Denver: US National Park Service, 1979. 11-26. Print.


Manuscripts and Archives
National Anthropological Archives
Smithsonian Institution
Washington DC

Finding Guides

Harrington, John PThe Papers of John P. Harrington: Alaska/Northwest Coast. Millwood: Kraus International, 1981.

Pilling, James CCatalogue of Linguistic Manuscripts in the Library of the Bureau of Ethnology. Washington: U. S. Bureau of American Ethnology, 1881. 24p.

Manuscripts

blue pin Abbott, George H. “Letter to George Gibbs, August 31 1858; with a Map and Census of the Coquille and Adjoining Tribes, and a Coquille Vocabulary.” 1858. 15p. Ms. 125.

blue pin Anderson, Alexander C. “Concordance of the Athapascan Languages: Chipeweyan, Carrier, Clatskanie, Kwalhioqua, Upper Umpqua, Tututni, Applegate, Hupa, Tolowa.” 1858. 12p. Ms. 123. This comparative vocabulary contains 108 words in each of the languages, and an 8 page appendix.

blue pin . “Klatskanai Vocabulary.” 1854. 6p. Ms. 107. Include about 180 words recorded in 1854 or 1855 from Ia-coos, a Clatskanie living at Cathlamet.

blue pin . “Vocabulary of the Willopah (Dialect of Tahcully, Athapasca): From an Indian at S. S. Fords, February, 1856.” 1856. 10p. Ms. 110.

blue pin Crook, George. “Tah-Leu-Wah (Tolowa) Vocabulary.” 1855. 6p. Ms. 86.

blue pin Crook, George, and Lorenzo Hubbard. “Clerk’s Copy of Crook’s Tolowa Vocabulary, and Lorenzo Hubbard’s Tututni Vocabulary of 61 Terms from the California Farmer, June 8, 1860.” 8p. Ms. 85.

blue pin Dorsey, James O. “Adjective Correlatives (or Correlative Adjective Pronouns) in the Tutu Dialect of Oregon, and Verb Conjugations.” 1884. 2 charts. Ms. 4800/382.

blue pin . “Chasta Costa Vocabulary, from the Athapascans Formerly Living on the Rogue River, Oregon.” 1884. 26p. Ms. 4800/374.

blue pin . “Chetco Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes, Formerly Spoken by the Athapascans Living on the Chetco River, Oregon.” 1884. 87p. Ms. 4800/376.

blue pin . “Comparative Notes on Athapascan Dialects of Oregon.” 1884. 7p. Ms. 4800/367.

blue pin . “Dakubetede Vocabulary Collected from the Athapascans Formerly Living on Applegate Creek, Oregon.” 1886. 19p. Ms. 4800/372.

blue pin . “Kwatami Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes, Spoken by the Athapascans Formerly Living on Sixes Creek, Oregon.” 1884. 49p. Ms. 4800/387.

blue pin . “Lists of Athapascan Tribal Divisions from Henshaw, Bancroft, Schoolcraft and Dall.” 1884. 5p., 5 cards. Ms. 4800/370.

blue pin . “Mikwunu Tunne Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes, Spoken by the Tututni Athapascans Formerly Living on the Lower Rogue River, Oregon.” 1884. 44p. Ms. 4800/377.

blue pin . “Modes of Predication in the Athapaskan Dialects of Oregon.” 1884. 2p. Ms. 4800/368.

blue pin . “Naltunnetunne Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes, as Spoken by the Athapascans Formerly Living on Naltunne River, Oregon.” 1884. 177p. Ms. 4800/388.

blue pin . “Notes on the Verb ‘To Have’ or ‘Possess': Oregon Athapascan, Lower Umpqua.” 1884. 3p. Ms. 4800/415.

blue pin . “Notes on Verbs in Tututni.” 1884. 7p. Ms. 4800/369.

blue pin . “Notes Relating to Dorsey’s Gentile System of the Siletz Tribes.” 1884. 50p. Ms. 4800/362. The manuscript includes some of the text of the published article, lists of villages and gentes at Siletz Agency, and a number of sketch maps and diagrams, including a sketch of Takelma localities (1 page on cardboard); and maps of Athapascan villages in Oregon and California, drawn “according to a Nal-tunne-tunne, Alex Ross, and E’-ne-a’-ti, a Tututunne”.

blue pin . “Partial Paradigms of over 167 Tututni Verbs.” 1884. 6 charts. Ms. 4800/383.

blue pin . “Qaunwate Vocabulary from the Athapascans Formerly Living on Smith River, California.” 1884. 15p. Ms. 4800/389.

blue pin . “Remarks on the Applegate Creek Indians (Dakubetede).” 1886. 1p. Ms. 4800/371.

blue pin . “Tabulation of the Number of Entries in the Vocabularies Recorded by Dorsey at Siletz Reservation, Oregon, 1884.” 1884. 5p. Ms. 4800/361.

blue pin . “Tceme Tunne (Joshua) Story of Creation.” 1884. 3p. Ms. 4800/385.

blue pin . “Tceme Tunne (Joshua) Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes.” 1884. 50p. Ms. 4800/379.

blue pin . “Tribes Resident on the Reservation at Toledo, Oregon.” 1884. 3p. Ms. 261.

blue pin . “Tutu Tunne or Tutu and Joshua Vocabulary, as Spoken in Several Athapascan Villages, with Grammatical and Miscellaneous Notes.” 1884. 375p., 6 charts. Ms. 4800/378.

blue pin . “Tutu Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes.” 1884. 98p., 3 charts. Ms. 4800/380.

blue pin . “Tututni Vocabulary: Original Notes and Vocabulary on Slips.” 1884. 200p. Ms. 4800/381.

blue pin . “Upper Coquille (Miciqwutme Tunne) Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes.” 1884. 112p. Ms. 4800/375.
Coquille Athapaskan materials derived from Coquille Thompson and Solomon in late 1884.

blue pin . “A Visit to the Siletz Agency.” 1884. 17p. Ms. 4800/364.

blue pin . “Yukitche Vocabulary and Grammatical Notes, Formerly Spoken by the Athapascans Living on Euchre Creek, Oregon.” 1884. 31p. Ms. 4800/386.

blue pin Everette, Willis E. “Names of the Tene Indian Tribes of Oregon.” 1882. 1p. Ms. 225.

blue pin . “Vocabulary of the Tu-Tu-Tene and Nine Confederated Tribes, Siletz River, Western Oregon.” 1882. 170p. Ms. 78.

blue pin Frachtenberg, Leo J. “Chemetunne (Joshua) Traditions.” 1900. 79p. Ms. 1724.

blue pin . “Kwalhioqua (Willapa) Vocabulary and a Short Text.” 17p. Ms. 4797. This vocabulary was probably collected from Mary Hudson in 1910, and includes some further word lists of unknown provenance.

blue pin Gatschet, Albert S. “Names of Tribes of Western Oregon in Tututni Language.” 1880. 1p. Ms. 4047. Included as part of Gatschet’s correspondence, this is a letter from Willis E. Everette giving tribal names in Tututni.

blue pin . “Umpqua (Athapascan) Vocabulary: Recorded at Grand Ronde Indian Reservation, Oregon.” 1877. 22p. Ms. 76.

blue pin Gibbs, George. “Comparative Vocabulary of Hupa, Henaggi, Tututni.” 1851-1852. 6p. Ms. 886.

blue pin . “Nabiltse Vocabulary.” 1851-1852. 2p. Ms. 131. Possibly an unknown Rogue River Athapaskan language, collected by Gibbs at Weitchpec in Northern California.

blue pin . “Observations on the Coast Tribes of Oregon.” 1856. 7p. Ms. 196. Collection consists of notes by Gibbs of material from George Crook, W. B. Hazen, and Dr. J. I. Milhau. There are also two incomplete draft manuscripts, each 9 pages. Tribes described include the Clatsop, Tillamook, Alsea, Kuitsh, Coos, Tututni, and Tolowa.

blue pin . “Vocabulary of the Willopah (Kwalhioqua) Dialect.” 6p.

blue pin Hamilton, Alexander S. “Haynarger (Tolowa) Vocabulary of 180 Words from Smith River, California.” 1856. 7p. Ms. 87.

blue pin Harrington, John P. The Papers of John P. Harrington: Alaska/Northwest Coast. Millwood: Kraus International, 1981. This finding guide provides access to the microfilmed edition of the papers of John Peabody Harrington in the National Anthropological Archives. Three of the microfilm reels cover Western Oregon Athapaskan. These are: #019: Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanai; #025-027: SW Oregon Athapaskan; #028: Galice-Applegate.

blue pin Hazen, William B. “Applegate Creek and Takelma Vocabularies.” 1857. 6p. Ms. 154 and 1655. Vocabularies are about 210 words.

blue pin . “Comparative Vocabularies of the Upper Rogue River Languages (Applegate, Takelma, and Shasta).” 1857. 8p. Ms. 154 and 1655. Vocabularies are about 180 words.

blue pin Kautz, August V. “English-Toutouten Vocabulary of about 70 Words, with Notes on Local Tribal Divisions by George Gibbs.” 1855. 10p. Ms. 199-200.

blue pin . “Letter from A. V. Kautz, Port Orford, June 19 1855, Including Census of 12 Tututni Bands Taken May-June 1854.” 1855. 4p. Ms. 201.

blue pin . “Tututni Vocabulary.” 1855. 22p. Ms. 198-200.

blue pin Krauss, Michael E. “Kwalhioqua and Clatskanie (Athapaskan) Linguistic Material.” 1963-1988. Ts. U of Alaska, Fairbanks. Print.

blue pin Marr, John P. Galice Creek Athabaskan Sound Recordings. Discs, audiotapes. John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives. 1097-1116. The original recordings were on 20 aluminum discs. The informant was Hoxie Simmons.

blue pin . Tolowa-Tututni Sound Recordings. Discs, audiotapes. John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives. 1244-1257. The original recordings were on 14 aluminum discs. The informant was Lucy Smith.

blue pin . Upper Coquille Athabaskan Sound Recordings. Discs, audiotapes. John Peabody Harrington Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Washington. 970-1003. Tape recordings of this set were presented to the Coquille Indian Tribe by the President of the University of Oregon in May 1998. The original recordings were on 34 aluminum discs. The informant was Coquille Thompson.

blue pin Milhau, John J. “Vocabulary of Umpqua Valley (Proper).” 1856. 21p. Ms. 193a-b. This vocabulary records about 360 words of Umpqua Athapaskan, which Milhau notes “is very similar to that spoken on the Headwaters of the Coquille.”

blue pin Powers, Stephen. “Tolowa Vocabulary.” 1p. Ms. 82. A vocabulary of 16 words.

blue pin Rigsby, Bruce J. “Report of a Trip to Siletz, Oregon, to See Archie Johnson, a Speaker of Coquille Athabaskan.” 1963. 4p. Ms. 4667.

blue pin Roehrig, F. L. O. “Comparative Vocabulary of Upper Umpqua and Willopah.” 9p. Ms. 155. Vocabularies of Umpqua and Kwalhioqua Athapaskan, based on material by Gibbs and Milhau.

blue pin Waterman, Thomas T. “The Athapascan Indians of Southwestern Oregon and Northwestern California.” 1921. 156p. Ms. 3183. This collection covers the Tolowa and Chetco-Tututni, and includes a wide variety of photographs and postcards of people and places along the southern Oregon coast and adjacent Tolowa territory in northwest California. There are also sketch maps showing Indian geographic names in the Chetco, Rogue River, and Tolowa tribal areas. Additional maps show the “rancherias” of the Tututunne and the Pistol River Chetleschantunne.


University of California, Berkeley

Finding Guides

Kroeber, Alfred LEthnological Manuscripts in the Robert H. Lowie Museum of Anthropology. Berkeley: California Indian Library Collections Project, 1989. 22p.

Valory, DaleGuide to Ethnological Documents (1-203) of the Dept. and Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Now in the University Archives. Berkeley: UC Berkeley Anthropology Dept., 1971. 73p.

Manuscripts

blue pin Driver, Harold E. “California Athapaskan and Other Vocabularies for Culture Element Distribution Studies.” 1935. 7p. Ms. Valory 5.1. Bancroft Library. Manuscript in the Bancroft Library and the California Indian Library Collection, Del Norte County Library, Crescent City. It includes comparisons of 60 Tolowa words with the Chilula, Nongatl, Mattole and Sinkyone language equivalents. The brief vocabularies were designed to check tribal identifications of informants.

blue pin Du Bois, Cora A. “Tututni (Rogue River Athapaskan) Field Notes.” 1934. 130p. Ms. Valory 6. Bancroft Library. Manuscript in the Bancroft Library and the California Indian Library Collection, Del Norte County Library, Crescent City. This manuscript contains general unsorted ethnographic, ethnogeographic, and linguistic data. Myth texts are not included.

blue pin Goddard, Pliny E. “Tolowa Tales and Texts, with Free and Interlinear Translations: with a Partial Index by A. L. Kroeber and a Table of Contents by Dale Valory.” 1902-1911. 311p. Ms. Valory 12.7 Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Manuscript set in the Hearst Museum and in the California Indian Library Collection, Del Norte County Library, Crescent City. This set of four typescript notebooks includes one volume of original free translations of myths (112p.); a second volume of untitled texts mostly without interlinear translations (70p.); a third volume of carbon-copy texts, complete with interlinear translations (71p.); and a fourth volume of original texts without interlinear translations (58p.)

blue pin Merriam, C. Hart. “Hah’-wung-kwut and ‘Huss Natural History Word Lists, Collected at Smith River Mouth and Crescent City, California.” 1910-1938. Ms. Anthropology Dept., U of California, Berkeley.

blue pin . “Hah’-wung-kwut (Huss or Tolowa) Vocabulary from Sam Lopez, Crescent City.” 1910-1938. Ms. Anthropology Dept., U of California, Berkeley.

blue pin . “Huss (Hah’-wun-kwut) Bands and Villages.” 1910-1938. 31p. Ms. Anthropology Dept., U of California, Berkeley. Lists village sites from Winchuk River on the California-Oregon border southwards to Wilson Creek, eight miles north of the Klamath River.

blue pin . “To-lo-wah or Huss Bands and Villages.” 1910-1938. 3p. Ms. Anthropology Dept., U of California, Berkeley.

blue pin Waterman, Thomas T. “Notes on Tolowa Culture and Geography.” 1921-22. 148p. Ms. Valory 101. Bancroft Library. Manuscript in the Bancroft Library, and the California Indian Library Collection, Del Norte County Library, Crescent City. The manuscript is in two parts: the first includes 69 pages of material on Tolowa geography and material culture, including canoe types; a myth “Disliked because of squaw-fish”; sketches of basket design; names for food and clothing; and clothing design. The second section covers place names along the coast, from Smith River north along the coast to Coos Bay, and also along the Rogue River. A typed section covers place names along the Smith River in Tolowa territory.


University of Washington, Seattle

Finding Guide

Seaburg, William RGuide to Pacific Northwest Native American Materials in the Melville Jacobs Collection and in Other Archival Collections in the University of Washington Libraries. Seattle: U of Washington Libraries, 1982. 113p.

Manuscripts

blue pin Hoijer, Harry. “Galice Athapaskan Stems.” 1956. 67p.

blue pin Jacobs, Elizabeth D. “Chetco Linguistic Notebooks from Billy Metcalf.” 1935. 186p. Ms. 72 and 116.

blue pin . “Galice Athapaskan Linguistic Notebooks from Hoxie Simmons.” 1935. 9p. Ms. 117 and 118.

blue pin . “Tututni Athapaskan Linguistic and Ethnographic Notebooks from Ida Baker.” 1934-35. 389p. Ms. 108, 109, 110, and 132.

blue pin . “Tututni Athapaskan Linguistic Slip Files from Ida Baker.” 1935. 1200 slips.

blue pin . “Upper Coquille Athapaskan Folklore from Coquille Thompson.” 1935. 93p.

blue pin . “Upper Coquille Athapaskan Linguistic and Ethnographic Notebooks from Coquille Thompson.” 1935. 870p. Ms. 71, 104, 116, and 119-121.

blue pin . “Upper Coquille Lexical Items, Phrases and Paradigms from Coquille Thompson.” 1935. 26p.

blue pin . “Upper Umpqua Linguistic and Ethnographic Notebook from Mrs. Jerden.” 1935. 26p. Ms. 131.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. “Chasta Costa Linguistic Data from Jake and Bensel Orten.” 1928. 27p. Ms. notebook 33.

blue pin . “Clatskanie Linguistic Slip Files from Clara Pearson.” 1934. 5 slips.

blue pin . Galice Creek Athabaskan Music and Texts. Discs, audiotapes. 14726-14729, 14740-14751. The original recordings were on 16 acetate discs. The informant was Hoxie Simmons.

blue pin . “Galice Creek Linguistic Field Notebooks from Hoxie Simmons.” 1935-1939. 520p. Ms. Ms. 117, 118, and 126-130.

blue pin . “Galice Creek Linguistic Slip Files from Hoxie Simmons.” 1935-1939. 3000 slips.

blue pin . “Key to Galice Creek Text Dictations.” 1935. 6p.

blue pin . “Orthographic Changes in the Writing of Galice.” 1955. 2p.

blue pin . “Phonetic Key to Galice-Applegate.” 1939. 1p.

blue pin . “Transcriptions, Translations and Annotations of Galice Sound Recordings.” 1939. 6p.

blue pin . Upper Coquille Athabaskan Music and Texts. Discs, audiotapes. 14705-14725. The original recordings were on 21 acetate discs. The informant was Coquille Thompson.


The Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia

Finding Guides

Freeman, John FA Guide to Manuscripts Relating to the American Indian in the Library of the American Philosophical Society. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Soc., 1966. 491p. Print.

Freeman, John F. et al. American Indian Manuscripts in the American Philosophical Society Library. Web.

Kendall, Daythal LA Supplement to A Guide to Manuscripts Relating to the American Indian in the Library of the American Philosophical Society. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Soc., 1982. 168p. Print.

Manuscripts

blue pin Boas, Franz. “Willapa Word Lists.” 1910-1924. 13p. Ms. 3847.

blue pin “Galice Record.” 16p. Ms. 4259. Includes nouns and verbs with various person markers.

blue pin Goddard, Pliny E. “Tolowa Field Notes.” 1902-1903. 18 notebooks. Ms. 3764. The collection consists of lexical items, paradigms, songs, museum specimens, texts, historical narratives, ethnological data, and names for material-culture objects. The information was collected at Smith River and Burnt Rock, California.

blue pin Teit, James A. “Notes to Willapa, an Athabascan Language.” 1910. 4p. Ms. 3848. Comparative notes based on a missing Kwalhioqua word list.


The University of Oregon Library, Eugene
Southwest Oregon Research Project

Finding Guide

Lewis, David GSouthwest Oregon Research Project: Inventory to the Archival Collection, Coll. 268. Eugene: Knight Library, University of Oregon, 2001. 113p.


 Don Macnaughtan
LCC Library
4000 East 30th Ave.
Eugene OR 97405

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