Chinookan Oral Literature

The Stories, Myths and Texts of the Clatsop, Kathlamet and Clackamas Peoples of the Lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington
Ethnographic Bibliographies no. 1

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blue pinIndian Languages of Western Oregon

Introduction

This bibliography lists the known published literature of the Chinookan peoples of the Lower Columbia River. The Chinook were renowned traders and fishermen who lived in dense settlements along the lower reaches of the Columbia River, from the Gorge of the Cascade Mountains westward to the Pacific. The Chinook were amongst the wealthiest people in the Pacific Northwest, by virtue of their control of trade routes and prized fishing locations along the river. Their oral literature was equally rich, and their mythical pantheon was populated by powerful spirit and animal figures, ghosts, and ancestors.

victoria
Victoria Howard

The Lower Columbia Chinookan Tribes

The Chinookans who lived along the Lower Columbia River were:

blue pin the tlacep or Clatsop people at the mouth of the River

blue pin the Shoalwater Chinook around Willapa Bay

blue pin the waqaiqam or Wahkiakum on the lower north bank of the river

blue pin the galamat or Kathlamet people on the lower south bank of the river

blue pin the malnumax or Multnomah people in Sauvie Island and the Portland Basin

blue pin the gitlakimas or Clackamas people along the Clackamas and Sandy Rivers


Bibliography

blue pin “The Animal People Hold a Medicine Chant (Chinook).” Nihancan’s Feast of Beaver: Animal Tales of the North American Indians. Ed. Edward Lavitt and Robert E. McDowell. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1990. Print.

blue pin “Badger and Coyote Were Neighbors (Clackamas Chinook).” Traditional Literatures of the American Indian: Texts and Interpretations. Ed. Karl Kroeber. Lincoln: U of Nebraska, 1981. Print.

blue pin “Blue Jay Visits Ghost Town (Chinook).” American Indian Myths and Legends. Ed. Richard Erdoes and Alfonso Ortiz. New York: Pantheon, 1984. Print.

blue pin “Bluejay Visits the Ghosts (Clatsop Chinook).” The Punishment of the Stingy and Other Stories. Ed. George B. Grinnell. Lincoln: U of Nebraska Press, 1982. Print.

blue pin “Bluejay the Imitator (Clatsop Chinook).” The Punishment of the Stingy and Other Stories. Ed. George B. Grinnell. Ed. Lincoln: U of Nebraska Press, 1982. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz. “Chinook Songs.” Journal of American Folklore 1 (1888): 220-226. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz. “Kathlamet Texts.” A Franz Boas Reader: The Shaping of American Anthropology, 1883-1911. Ed. George W. Stocking. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1974. 116-122. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz. Chinook Texts. Washington: GPO, 1894. 278p. Print.

blue pin Boas, Franz. Kathlamet Texts. Washington: GPO, 1901. 261p. Print.

blue pin Bullock, Dave. “A Chinook Indian Tale.” Marion Carter Storytelling Festival. Salt Lake City Public Library, 1988. 120 min. Videocassette.

blue pin “Chinook Ghosts.” Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest. Ed. Katharine B. Judson. Chicago: A. C. McClurg, 1910. Print.

blue pin “Coyote and the Cedar Tree (Clackamas Chinook).” Northwest Passages: A Literary Anthology of the Pacific Northwest. Ed. Bruce Barcott. Seattle: Sasquatch Books, 1994. Print.

blue pin Coyote Was Going There: Indian Literature of the Oregon Country. Ed. Jarold W. Ramsey. Seattle: U of Washington Press, 1977. 295p. Print.

blue pin “The First European Ship Comes To Clatsop Country.” Varieties of Hope: An Anthology of Oregon Prose. Ed. Gordon B. Dodds. Corvallis: Oregon State UP, 1993. Print.

blue pin “The Gift of the Totems (Kathlamet Chinook).” American Indian Tales and Legends. Ed. Vladimir Hulpach. London: Paul Hamlyn, 1965. Print.

blue pin “Grizzly Woman Began to Kill People (Clackamas Chinook).” Traditional Literatures of the American Indian: Texts and Interpretations. Ed. Karl Kroeber. Lincoln: U of Nebraska, 1981. Print.

blue pin Howard, Victoria. “Awl and Her Son’s Son.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 3.1 (1991): 8-12. Print.

blue pin Howard, Victoria. “Five Short Narratives.” Alcheringa 3 (1977): 2-7. Print.

blue pin Howard, Victoria. “Grizzly Woman Killed People.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 3.1 (1991): 13-18. Print.

blue pin Howard, Victoria. Moons: Four Short Verses in Clackamas and English. Portland: Irish Setter, nd. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “A Pattern of Verbal Irony in Chinookan.” International Journal of the Sociology of Language 65 (1987): 97-110. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “A Theory of Irony and a Chinookan Pattern of Verbal Exchange.” The Pragmatic Perspective: Selected Papers from the 1985 International Pragmatics Conference. Ed. Jef Verschueren. Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1987. 293-338. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Myth and Tale Titles of the Lower Chinook.” Journal of American Folklore 72 (1959): 139-145. Rpt. in ‘ In Vain I Tried to Tell You’: Essays in Native American Ethnopoetics. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania Press, 1981. 263-273. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Poetic Structure of a Chinook Text.” Essays in Honor of Charles F. Hockett. Ed. Frederick B. Agard et al. Leiden, Amsterdam: E. J. Brill, 1983. 507-525. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Reading Clackamas Texts.” Traditional Literatures of the American Indian: Texts and Interpretations. Ed. Karl Kroeber. Lincoln: U of Nebraska, 1981. 117-159. Rpt. in ‘In Vain I Tried to Tell You’: Essays in Native American Ethnopoetics. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania Press, 1981. 342-381. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Seal and Her Younger Brother Lived Here.” Hermes July 1991: 132-133. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “The Earliest Clackamas Text.” International Journal of American Linguistics 50 (1984): 358-383. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “The ‘Wife’ Who ‘Goes Out’ Like a Man: Reinterpretation of a Clackamas Chinook Myth.” Social Science Information 7.3 (1968): 173-199. Rpt. in ‘ In Vain I Tried to Tell You’: Essays in Native American Ethnopoetics. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania Press, 1981. 274-308. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Verse Analysis of a Kathlamet Chinook Text Preserved by Franz Boas: Charles Cultee’s ‘Southwest Wind’s Myth’.” Aims and Prospects of Semiotics: Essays in Honor of Algirdas Julien Greimas. Ed. Herman Parret and Hans George Ruprecht. Amsterdam: J. Benjamins, 1985. 953-978. Print.

blue pin Hymes, Dell H. “Victoria Howard’s Gitskux and His Older Brother: A Clackamas Chinook Myth.” Smoothing the Ground: Essays on Native American Oral Literature. Ed. Brian Swann. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1983. 129-170. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. “Humor and Social Structure in an Oral Literature.” Culture in History: Essays in Honor of Paul Radin. Ed. Stanley Diamond. New York: Columbia UP, 1960. 181-189. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. “Psychological Inferences from a Chinook Myth.” Journal of American Folklore 65 (1952): 121-137. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. Clackamas Chinook Texts. Bloomington: U of Indiana, 1959. 663p. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. The Content and Style of an Oral Literature: Clackamas Chinook Myths and Tales. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 1959. 285p. Print.

blue pin Jacobs, Melville. The People Are Coming Soon: Analyses of Clackamas Chinook Myths and Tales. Seattle: U of Washington Press, 1960. 359p. Print.

blue pin Martin, Rafe, and David Shannon. The Boy Who Lived with the Seals. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1993. 32p. Print.

blue pin Milner, Clyde A. , ed. “A Chinook Story, Recorded in 1894.” Major Problems in the History of the American West: Documents and Essays. Lexington: D. C. Heath, 1989. 37-38. Print.

blue pin Nichols, William. “Badger and Coyote Were Neighbors: Comic Reconciliation in a Clackamas Chinook Myth.” Smoothing the Ground: Essays on Native American Oral Literature. Ed. Brian Swann. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1983. 301-308. Print.

blue pin “Origin of the Tribes (Chinook).” Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest. Ed. Katharine B. Judson. Chicago: A. C. McClurg, 1910. Print.

blue pin “The Punishment of the Stingy (Clatsop Chinook).” The Punishment of the Stingy and Other Stories. Ed. George B. Grinnell. Lincoln: U of Nebraska Press, 1982. Print.

blue pin Ramsey, Jarold W. “The Wife Who Goes Out Like a Man, Comes Back as a Hero: The Art of Two Oregon Indian Narratives.” PMLA 92 (1977): 9-18. Rpt. in Folk Groups and Folklore Genres: A Reader. Ed. Elliott Oring. Logan: Utah State UP, 1989. 209-223. Print.

blue pin Scharbach, Alexander. “Aspects of Existentialism in Clackamas Chinook Myths.” Journal of American Folklore 75 (1962): 15-22. Print.

blue pin Seaburg, William R., and Pamela T. Amoss , eds. Badger and Coyote Were Neighbors: Melville Jacobs on Northwest Indian Myths and Tales. Corvallis: Oregon State UP, 2000. 310p. Print.

blue pin “Seal and Her Younger Brother Lived There (Clackamas Chinook).” Coming to Light: Contemporary Translations of the Native Literatures of North America. Ed. Brian Swann. New York: Vintage Books, 1996. Print.

blue pin Silverstein, Michael. “The Culture of Language in Chinookan Narrative Texts: Or, on Saying That in Chinook.” Grammar Inside and Outside the Clause: Some Approaches to Theory from the Field. Ed. Johanna Nichols and Anthony C. Woodbury. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1985. 132-171. Print.

blue pin “The Sun’s Myth (Kathlamet Chinook).” The Telling of the World: Native American Stories and Art. Ed. W. S. Penn. New York: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1996. Print.

blue pin “Tallapus and the Cedar (Clatsop).” Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest. Ed. Katharine B. Judson. Chicago: A. C. McClurg, 1910. Print.

blue pin “The Sun’s Myth (Kathlamet Chinook).” Coming to Light: Contemporary Translations of the Native Literatures of North America. Ed. Brian Swann. New York: Vintage Books, 1996. Print.

blue pin “The Tahmanous Man (Chinook).” Native Americans of the Pacific Coast. Ed. Vinson Brown. Happy Camp: Naturegraph, 1985. Print.

blue pin Thompson, Craig B. “Gender Representation in Two Clackamas Myths.” Studies in American Indian Literatures 3.1 (1991):19-39. Print.

blue pin “Tongue (Clackamas Chinook).” The Telling of the World: Native American Stories and Art. Ed. W. S. Penn. New York: Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1996. Print.

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